Boeing

Latest

  • AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

    Boeing will freeze 737 Max production as FAA review carries on

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    12.16.2019

    As you've probably noticed, Boeing's flawed 737 Max still hasn't received the regulatory all-clear as 2019 draws to a close -- and that's now affecting manufacturing. Boeing said it will suspend 737 Max production in January now that the FAA expects its safety evaluation to continue in 2020. It's uncertain how long the freeze will last, but that's likely to hinge on when (and if) the aircraft is allowed to fly again. While airlines have ruled out using the 737 Max until March or later, there's no guarantee they'll be allowed to fly by then.

  • Boeing

    Boeing's lunar lander pitch promises 'fastest path' to the moon

    by 
    Mariella Moon
    Mariella Moon
    11.06.2019

    Boeing wants to make one of the Artemis program lunar landers that will take humans to the surface of the moon. The aerospace company has submitted a proposal to NASA for an integrated Human Lander System (HLS), which it says will be designed to reach the moon in the "fewest steps" possible. NASA has been accepting proposals from private space corporations and is expected to choose at least two of them by January next year for development. Blue Origin announced its own take on a lander called "Blue Moon" -- which it will develop in partnership with Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and Draper -- earlier this year.

  • Boeing

    Watch Boeing's Starliner capsule launch abort test at 9AM ET

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    11.03.2019

    Boeing's CST-100 Starliner capsule is about to take a step closer toward taking people to orbit, and you can watch this step unfold first-hand. NASA and Boeing are streaming live coverage of the Starliner's pad abort test on November 4th at 9AM Eastern. Like similar tests, the New Mexico dry run will verify whether the vessel can safely jettison itself (and importantly, astronauts) away from its host rocket if there's an emergency before liftoff. The four launch abort engines and control thrusters will lift the spacecraft roughly a mile above the ground and a mile north of the test platform.

  • US Air Force

    Air Force's X-37B space plane lands after record 780 days in orbit

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    10.27.2019

    There was no doubt that the US Air Force's X-37B was going to break its own record for time spent in orbit, but it's now clear by how much. The mysterious Boeing-made space plane has landed at Kennedy Space Center after 780 days in orbit, comfortably surpassing the earlier record of 717 days, 20 hours and 42 minutes. That's more than three times the 240 days originally expected from the reusable vehicle, which just finished its fifth mission.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Crash investigators fault 737 Max's design and approval process

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    10.25.2019

    The Boeing 737 Max had design flaws that were made worse by inadequate pilot training and a faulty approval process that led to the Lion Air accident, Indonesian investigators concluded. Their report confirms multiple stories about Boeing's faulty MCAS control system, why pilots weren't properly trained on it and how it got approved in the first place, according to the Washington Post. The October 29, 2018 accident killed eight crew and 181 passengers.

  • PHILIP PACHECO via Getty Images

    SpaceX's next Crew Dragon test could happen next week

    by 
    Kris Holt
    Kris Holt
    10.24.2019

    SpaceX is reportedly gearing up for the next test of its Crew Dragon capsule. A static fire test (a simulated launch with a rocket engine secured to the ground) is set to take place at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida November 2nd, according to CNBC. Engadget has contacted SpaceX for comment.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Boeing messages hint staff may have misled FAA about 737 Max

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    10.18.2019

    There have already been signs that the 737 Max's fatal safety flaw may have stemmed from misunderstandings, and now investigators appear to have more tangible evidence of this. Boeing has confirmed to Reuters that it gave the FAA instant messages indicating that pilots may have misled regulators about the performance of the MCAS anti-stall technology linked to two deadly crashes. The company's then-serving chief technical pilot told another pilot that he had "basically lied" to the FAA about MCAS during the 737 Max's certification process, albeit "unknowingly." That's consistent with earlier New York Times claims that the chief technical pilot didn't fully understand the system.

  • Porsche/Boeing

    Boeing and Porsche are developing an electric 'flying car'

    by 
    Mariella Moon
    Mariella Moon
    10.11.2019

    Boeing has teamed up with luxury sports carmaker Porsche to develop a concept for an electric vehicle capable of vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) -- in other words, they're working on a "flying car." The companies' engineers will even collaborate to build and test a prototype based on the design they'll come up with, which will most likely be a premium VTOL model to stay true to Porsche's brand.

  • Will Lipman for Engadget

    The dream of flying taxis may not be too far off

    by 
    Andrew Tarantola
    Andrew Tarantola
    08.20.2019

    "Mark my words. A combination of airplane and motorcar is coming. You may smile. But it will come," Henry Ford quipped in 1940. Our dreams of cars capable of taking flight at the whim of their driver have been around nearly as long as we've had cars themselves, or at least as long as we've endured heavy commute traffic. Yet the prospect of actual, commercially available flying automobiles has always seemed to remain just out of reach, only a few years from viability. But even as drones become commonplace, are we really any closer to an age of aeronautical automobiles than we were in Ford's day?

  • Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

    Boeing may use two computers to fix 737 Max's latest flaw

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    08.04.2019

    Boeing may have a solution for the 737 Max flaw discovered in June. Both the AP and the Seattle Times claim the aircraft maker is developing new software that will take input from both of the aircraft's flight control computers to improve its reliability, rather than one at a time as it does today. This would both address the newer issue (more on that shortly) and increase the trustworthiness of the MCAS system whose fatal errors prompted the jet's grounding.

  • NurPhoto via Getty Images

    Cellphone interference still poses a risk aboard some Boeing jets

    by 
    Amrita Khalid
    Amrita Khalid
    07.18.2019

    Even switching your phone to airplane mode won't keep it from being a risk on some Boeing jets. A 2014 FAA study revealed that some cockpit screens on Boeing 737 and 777 jets are vulnerable to interference from WiFi, cell phone signals or even weather radar. Bloomberg reported today that while many have been replaced, some jets still contain the outdated models built by Honeywell International, Inc.

  • Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

    European regulators demand changes to 737 Max autopilot

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    07.07.2019

    It's not just American officials who think Boeing's 737 Max software needs more polish. A Bloomberg source said that the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has told Boeing to make five changes to the airliner before it can return to service. They're mostly consistent with the FAA's requests, including improvements to the angle of attack sensors, training, manual trim controls and a software flaw linked to a lagging chip. However, the EU regulators also want Boeing to address a previously unmentioned issue with the autopilot failing to switch off in some emergencies -- it might not give pilots enough time to prevent a stall.

  • Kitty Hawk Corporation

    Boeing teams with flying taxi startup Kitty Hawk on 'urban air mobility'

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    06.26.2019

    Two of the better-known names in flying taxi development are getting together. Boeing and Kitty Hawk have formed a partnership that will have the two foster "safe urban air mobility." While they're unsurprisingly keeping their exact plans under wraps, the team-up is described as mating Kitty Hawk's innovative side with Boeing's sheer size and experience in the aircraft business.

  • David Ryder via Getty Images

    FAA discovers another potential risk with the Boeing 737 Max

    by 
    Kris Holt
    Kris Holt
    06.26.2019

    The Federal Aviation Administration has discovered another potential risk with the grounded 737 Max that Boeing has to resolve. The issue emerged during a simulator test last week, according to Reuters. As such, a certification test flight isn't expected to take place until July 8th at the earliest, further delaying the plane's return to service.

  • Boeing

    Boeing is closer to ISS spaceflights after Starliner's final parachute test

    by 
    Mariella Moon
    Mariella Moon
    06.26.2019

    Boeing's Starliner capsule has successfully touched down at the US Army's White Sands Missile Range even though it didn't deploy all of its parachutes. The company had to disable two of its over half a dozen parachutes, so it can pass the final and most difficult qualification test it needed to go through to be able to fly astronauts to the ISS. One of the reasons why the Government Accountability Office expects further delays to the Commercial Crew program is because Boeing still needs to conduct some parachute tests. This most recent success could mean Starliner's first flight could truly happen sometime this summer, like the company is hoping.

  • NASA/Johnson Space Center

    NASA could see more delays for SpaceX and Boeing private space flights

    by 
    Mariella Moon
    Mariella Moon
    06.21.2019

    When NASA awarded Boeing and SpaceX contracts to develop vehicles that can take astronauts to the ISS, it was hoping they'll be done by 2017. Unfortunately, both companies grappled with technical challenges that forced them to delay their timelines. A new Government Accountability Office report even wants NASA to prepare for even more delays, as neither company is near to meeting all the agency's requirements for manned spaceflight.

  • AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

    Boeing reportedly left engineers, officials unaware of 737 Max changes

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    06.02.2019

    Boeing's overestimation of the 737 Max's safety may have been prompted in part by a simple but dangerous problem: many of the people involved weren't aware of the changes. The New York Times has claimed that some engineers, testers and regulators were unaware Boeing had made the jet's MCAS anti-stall system far more aggressive. They operated on the assumption the technology relied on two sensors when it was using just one, and a "compartmentalized approach" to development left key engineers without a full understanding of how the system worked.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Bird strike may have triggered software issue in second 737 Max crash

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    05.21.2019

    Investigators might know what triggered the software panic aboard an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max before its fatal crash, and it could be something Boeing considered months earlier. Unnamed officials talking to the Wall Street Journal claim that US aviation overseers "increasingly believe" that a bird collision may have sent flawed sensor data, leading to the jet's anti-stall code automatically pushing the nose down. Black box recordings show that a sensor was "sheared off" or otherwise broken soon after takeoff, experts said.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Boeing says its 737 Max software update is complete

    by 
    Christine Fisher
    Christine Fisher
    05.16.2019

    Today, Boeing announced that it has completed the software update to its 737 Max planes. The update is meant to correct the software flaws that contributed to the Lion Air and Air Ethiopia crashes that killed 346 people in total. The update was expected in April, but Boeing needed extra time to guarantee that it had "identified and appropriately addressed" the problems that led to those crashes.

  • Loren Elliott via Getty Images

    Boeing shows off its Starliner's latest parachute test

    by 
    Richard Lawler
    Richard Lawler
    05.10.2019

    As SpaceX and Boeing continue with their commercial crew space race, Boeing posted this video showing a test of the parachutes on its Starliner vehicle. The plan is for the crew to parachute down in the American southwest after departing the ISS aboard Boeing's spacecraft, and keep it in good enough shape to be reused up to ten times. We've seen video of similar tests for the SpaceX Dragon capsule, and even close-up images of the Starliner crashing down on its airbags. The spacecraft's first uncrewed flight test has been pushed back repeatedly and is now on the schedule for August -- while we hope we never see these features deployed, they're important to test before anyone actually takes a ride in the thing.