Boeing

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  • Loren Elliott via Getty Images

    Boeing shows off its Starliner's latest parachute test

    by 
    Richard Lawler
    Richard Lawler
    05.10.2019

    As SpaceX and Boeing continue with their commercial crew space race, Boeing posted this video showing a test of the parachutes on its Starliner vehicle. The plan is for the crew to parachute down in the American southwest after departing the ISS aboard Boeing's spacecraft, and keep it in good enough shape to be reused up to ten times. We've seen video of similar tests for the SpaceX Dragon capsule, and even close-up images of the Starliner crashing down on its airbags. The spacecraft's first uncrewed flight test has been pushed back repeatedly and is now on the schedule for August -- while we hope we never see these features deployed, they're important to test before anyone actually takes a ride in the thing.

  • NASA

    Boeing delays its first Starliner test flight until August

    by 
    Christine Fisher
    Christine Fisher
    04.03.2019

    For a while, Boeing and SpaceX have been neck-and-neck in their race to provide the first commercial space travel. That might be changing, as NASA and Boeing announced they'll delay the first uncrewed flight test of Boeing's Starliner. The spacecraft will now launch in August -- a full year after it was first scheduled to takeoff.

  • Mario Tama/Getty Images

    Boeing's 737 Max update is still 'weeks' away from FAA approval

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    04.01.2019

    It's going to be a long while before the FAA officially approves Boeing's 737 Max software update. The regulator said it expected the update to arrive in the "coming weeks," as Boeing needed extra time to guarantee that it had "identified and appropriately addressed" the problems that may have led to crashes in Ethiopia and Indonesia. After that, the FAA still intends to conduct a "rigorous safety review."

  • AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

    Boeing explains its 737 Max software update

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    03.27.2019

    Boeing has detailed its promised software update for 737 Max jets, and it largely matches up with the rumored safety improvements that could reduce the likelihood of a crash. The anti-stall Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) will now compare the data from both of the 737's angle-of-attack sensors, rather than relying on one. If there's a disagreement of 5.5 degrees or more, MCAS won't kick in. The software will also reduce its input during an incident, and won't apply so much input to the stabilizers that the crew can't counteract it.

  • Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

    FAA 'tentatively' approves software fix for 737 Max jets

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    03.24.2019

    Boeing may be close to delivering its fix for the 737 Max's anti-stall system and preventing future tragedies. The Wall Street Journal has learned through documents and sources that the FAA has "tentatively" greenlit software and training updates pending some final simulation and real-world flight tests. They could make their way to airlines within a few weeks, according to the insiders, although there's still the possibility of last-minute revisions and changes to the timeline.

  • Boeing sold essential safety features as extras on 737 Max

    by 
    AJ Dellinger
    AJ Dellinger
    03.21.2019

    Boeing charged airlines extra for two safety features that may have been able to detect in advance issues with the 737 Max planes involved in fatal crashes, according to the New York Times. The additional sensors provided checks on data collected by sensors on the planes and could have alerted pilots to potential issues. Boeing will now make one of those safety add-ons standard issue on the 737 Max.

  • Bloomberg via Getty Images

    Report: Boeing's crucial 737 Max safety analysis was flawed

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    03.18.2019

    Boeing's original 737 Max safety analysis, used by the FAA to certify the aircraft, may have had several serious flaws, according to a report from the Seattle Times. The problems revolved around a software system called MCAS, suspected to have contributed to the Lion Air and Air Ethiopia crashes that killed 346 people in total. Investigators are also looking at possible maintenance lapses and potential pilot error. The situation may have been compounded by FAA rules that allow aircraft manufacturers to do some of the certification themselves.

  • JIM WATSON via Getty Images

    US grounds all Boeing 737 Max planes

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    03.13.2019

    Less than one day after expressing confidence in Boeing's 737 Max fleet, the US government has decided to ground the plane involved in two recent crashes. According to CNBC, President Trump told reporters that the US was issuing an emergency order to ground both Boeing's 737 Max 8 and 737 Max 9 aircraft, following similar prohibitions in the UK, France, Germany, Australia, Indonesia, China and elsewhere. Trump made the decision in concert with FAA acting director Daniel Elwell and US transportation secretary Elaine Chao and had spoke with Boeing CEO about the move as well. "They are all in agreement with the action," he said. "Any plane currently in the air will go to its destination and thereafter be grounded until further notice."

  • Bloomberg via Getty Images

    Boeing will release software updates for 737 Max jets by April

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    03.12.2019

    Following two air disasters months apart, Boeing has promised to release software updates for all of its Boeing 737 Max aircraft by next month at the latest. The updates were developed in the aftermath of the Lion Air Flight 610 disaster that killed 189 people, the company said, and include changes to flight control systems, pilot displays, operation manuals and crew training.

  • Boeing

    Boeing’s autonomous fighter jet could arrive next year

    by 
    Rachel England
    Rachel England
    02.27.2019

    Boeing has unveiled an autonomous fighter jet which is expected to take to the skies in 2020. The aircraft is designed to fly alongside crewed jets during combat, performing early warning tests, intelligence gathering, surveillance and reconnaissance.

  • Boeing

    Boeing's self-flying taxi completes its first flight

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    01.23.2019

    Multiple companies have outlined plans for flying taxis, but Boeing just took an important step toward making them a practical reality. The aircraft maker has completed the first test flight of its autonomous electric VTOL aircraft, verifying that the machine can take off, hover and land. It's a modest start, to put it mildly -- the taxi has yet to fly forward, let alone transition from vertical to forward flight modes. That still puts it ahead of competitors, though, and it's no mean feat when the aircraft existed as little more than a concept roughly one year ago.

  • NASA launching safety review of SpaceX because Elon Musk smoked pot

    by 
    AJ Dellinger
    AJ Dellinger
    11.20.2018

    When NASA tapped SpaceX and Boeing to fly astronauts to the International Space Station, the companies likely expected the government agency would keep a close eye on things. But they probably didn't expect a probe prompted by a podcast. According to the Washington Post, NASA is conducting a safety review of both companies because some officials were annoyed when they found out SpaceX CEO Elon Musk smoked weed with Joe Rogan.

  • Aurora Flight Sciences/YouTube

    Boeing's solar-powered climate research drone takes flight in 2019

    by 
    AJ Dellinger
    AJ Dellinger
    11.14.2018

    Aurora Flight Sciences, a subsidiary of Boeing that specializes in unmanned aerial vehicles, is gearing up to launch a solar-powered autonomous aircraft. The vehicle, called Odysseus, is designed for persistent flight at high-altitudes and will be used to perform climate and atmospheric research. Its first voyage is scheduled for the spring of 2019.

  • XXSTRINGERXX xxxxx / Reuters

    Japan teams up with Uber, Airbus and 19 others on flying taxi plan

    by 
    Mallory Locklear
    Mallory Locklear
    08.24.2018

    Japan wants to bring flying taxis into the mainstream over the next decade and it's putting together a government-led group in order to do so, Bloomberg reports. The country's trade ministry said to today that the group will bring together at least 21 businesses including Uber, Boeing, Airbus, Japan Airlines and Toyota-backed Cartivator, which will meet next week to discuss plans going forward. For its part, the government will work on ways to regulate these sorts of vehicles. "The Japanese government will provide appropriate support to help realize the concept of flying cars, such as creation of acceptable rules," the ministry said.

  • NASA

    NASA announces astronauts for first Commercial Crew missions

    by 
    Swapna Krishna
    Swapna Krishna
    08.03.2018

    Today, NASA announced the astronaut selection for the first Commercial Crew flights, which will finally restore the ability to launch astronauts from American soil. Boeing's first test flight, which is scheduled for mid-2019, will have Eric Boe, social media-savvy astronaut Chris Ferguson and rookie Nicole Aunapu Mann on board. SpaceX's inaugural Crew Dragon voyage, called Demo-2 and targeting April 2019, will have Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley on board.

  • NASA/KSC

    Boeing delays first crewed spacecraft test to mid-2019

    by 
    Swapna Krishna
    Swapna Krishna
    08.02.2018

    On a media phone call this week, John Mulholland, who oversees NASA's commercial crew program at Boeing, revised the dates for the first uncrewed and crewed tests of the Starliner capsule, according to Ars Technica. The uncrewed test will be sometime in late 2018. The crewed test won't take place until mid-2019. It was previously scheduled for the end of this year.

  • NASA/KSC/Aerojet Rocketdyne

    Boeing’s spacecraft faces even longer delays after propellant leak

    by 
    Swapna Krishna
    Swapna Krishna
    07.23.2018

    The road to NASA's Commercial Crew -- restoring human spaceflight capabilities to the US -- has been bumpy, to say the least. And now, it appears that there has been another setback. Ars Technica uncovered a previously undisclosed issue that Boeing's spacecraft, the Starliner, suffered during a test of its launch abort engines.

  • GoFly Prize / Texas A&M University

    Boeing gave $20,000 to these ten wacky personal flyer designs

    by 
    Mallory Locklear
    Mallory Locklear
    06.14.2018

    Last year, Boeing announced the GoFly Prize, a new competition that will award one winner $1 million for a successful personal flying device prototype. It has to take off and land vertically, carry a human 20 miles without the need for refueling or recharging and be quiet, safe and compact, but otherwise, the design is completely up to those building it. Phase I of the competition just wrapped up and GoFly has announced the top 10 designs, each of which will be awarded $20,000.

  • Boeing

    Boeing's folding wingtips get the FAA green light

    by 
    Kris Holt
    Kris Holt
    05.18.2018

    Passengers on Boeing's new line of 777 planes might not have to take a bus from the gate across the tarmac, despite much larger wings potentially making it difficult for the aircraft to navigate terminals. That's because the company received Federal Aviation Administration approval today for its folding wingtips -- those will let the planes stop at airport gates big enough to accommodate typical 777 models.

  • Aurora Flight Sciences

    Autonomous helicopter makes first operational delivery to Marines

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    05.18.2018

    Drones are coming to the battlefield faster than you think. Aurora Flight Sciences recently unveiled an autonomous, LiDAR equipped helicopter called AACUS, which was already an impressive feat, considering a helicopter's complexity. Now, for the first time, it has completed an autonomous, closed-loop cargo mission, delivering gas, water and medical supplies to US Marines during an integrated training exercise in California.