humanoid

Latest

  • Agility Robotics' Digits

    Agility Robotics is building its first bipedal robot factory in Oregon

    by 
    Malak Saleh
    Malak Saleh
    09.18.2023

    Agility Robotics, the maker of humanoid robots, is opening a new manufacturing plant in Oregon that is expected to produce 10,000 "Digits" a year. The warehouse robots are designed to fill a gap in the logistics and distribution industry.

  • A white and black android stands in a shadowy warehouse corridor, facing the camera.

    Apptronik’s Apollo is the latest humanoid robot to beat Tesla to market

    by 
    Will Shanklin
    Will Shanklin
    08.23.2023

    Apptronik unveiled a new workforce robot today. Named Apollo, the machine is designed to “work in environments designed for, and directly alongside, humans.” The android is initially intended to move and carry cases and totes in logistics and manufacturing settings. But the Austin-based Apptronik sees Apollo expanding into “construction, oil and gas, electronics production, retail, home delivery, elder care” and more. Apollo follows Xiaomi’s reveal of the CyberOne robot last year, which looked remarkably similar to the still-unreleased Tesla Bot.

  • 'Ameca' robot shows off more human-like facial expressions

    'Ameca' robot shows off more human-like facial expressions

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    12.06.2021

    Engineered Arts, the company behind the human-like Mesmer robot series, has unveiled a new creation that may weird you out even more.

  • Ubtech

    Ubtech’s latest educational, dancing robot is bigger and more lifelike

    by 
    Christine Fisher
    Christine Fisher
    10.10.2019

    There are plenty of educational coding robots, but few have moves like UBTECH's dancing robot MeeBot. UBTECH launched the JIMU build-your-own-bot kit for MeeBot in 2016. Today, the company unveiled MeeBot 2.0.

  • AIST

    Humanoid construction robot installs drywall by itself

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    10.01.2018

    If Japan's Advanced Industrial Science and Technology Institute has its way, construction workers might be a thing of the past. Researchers have built HRP-5P, a humanoid bot that can handle a variety of construction tasks when there's either a staffing shortage or serious hazards. The prototype uses a mix of environment detection, object recognition and careful movement planning to install drywall by itself -- it can hoist up boards and fasten them with a screwdriver.

  • Joseph DelPreto / MIT CSAIL

    MIT uses brain signals and hand gestures to control robots

    by 
    Rachel England
    Rachel England
    06.20.2018

    Robotic technology has a staggering range of applications, but getting it to perform adequately can be a challenge, requiring specific programming based around the way humans communicate with language. But now, researchers from MIT have developed a way to control robots more intuitively, using hand gestures and brainwaves.

  • Chris McGrath via Getty Images

    A humanoid is born in a Turkish robotics factory

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    03.19.2018

    The Uncanny Valley posits that robots get exponentially creepier the closer they look to humans -- take Nadine the social robot, RealDoll and the Geminoids (please). However, a company called Akin Robotics in Turkey has proved that robots don't need to look like humans at all to evoke the "ugh" factor. It recently unveiled a new factory that will produce an Eyes Without a Face-like model that will surprise, delight and terrify visitors at airports and elsewhere.

  • Toyota

    Toyota's T-HR3 robot mimics your movements

    by 
    Richard Lawler
    Richard Lawler
    11.21.2017

    While Honda's ASIMO has taken much of the attention for automaker-built robots, Toyota has been working on humanoid helpers of its own for years, and now it's unveiling a third-generation model. The THR-3 expands on previous models built to test specific joints and movements by putting together a full body to be controlled by a human operating its Master Maneuvering System. The force feedback-enabled control system includes a head-mounted display (HTC Vive), "data glove" and torque servos that allows the operator to "instantly manipulate" the robot by mapping their motions and force precisely.

  • Boston Dynamics

    Watch Boston Dynamics' Atlas robot nail a backflip

    by 
    Saqib Shah
    Saqib Shah
    11.17.2017

    We've grown accustomed to seeing Boston Dynamics' impressive line-up of robots strutting about in periodic video updates, each more terrifying than the last. But, every once in a while, the company unleashes a clip so awesome you can't help but watch. And, so it is with its latest vid starring the humanoid machine known as Atlas. You know, the poor bot that's been toiling away for years, in between tethered walks and prods from its human trainers. The 5-foot 9-inch robot is currently lighter and more agile than ever (thanks to last year's upgrade), and now it's gone all Jackie Chan for a backflip.

  • Honda R&D

    Honda's disaster recovery robot can climb ladders

    by 
    Rachel England
    Rachel England
    10.03.2017

    The disaster response team of the future could be made up of an army of cheery orange robots, according to Honda. The company has unveiled a working prototype of its E2-DR disaster response robot -- first revealed in an R&D paper in 2015 -- and it can do a lot. At 1.68 meters high and weighing in at 85 kilograms, E2-DR can walk, step over objects, climb stairs and ladders, slink through narrow spaces and traverse piles of debris. It can even tolerate rain for 20 straight minutes, which is more than a lot of actual people can.

  • EPFL

    Robots learn to walk naturally by understanding their bodies

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    09.24.2017

    The challenge with bipedal robots isn't so much getting them to walk at all (although that's sometimes a problem) as it is getting them to walk naturally. They tend to either step cautiously or quickly run into trouble. Swiss researchers think they can do better, though: they're working on COMAN (Compliant Humanoid), a headless robot designed to master walking. The automaton is more graceful through a combination of more flexible, elastic joints and a control algorithm that helps the bot understand its own body.

  • Watch Boston Dynamics' humanoid robot balance on one foot

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    09.11.2016

    Humanoid robots still have problems staying upright, especially in tricky situations, but it's evident that they're making some progress. IHMC has posted a video showing Boston Dynamics' Atlas robot balancing on one foot on the edge of a plywood board about 0.8 inches thick. The feat is a "lucky run," IHMC admits (it's rare that the robot stays poised for so long), but it's relatively effortless. The worst you see before the fall is shaking as IHMC's algorithm sometimes makes poor estimates of the robot's state.

  • Japan's latest humanoid robot makes its own moves

    by 
    Mat Smith
    Mat Smith
    07.30.2016

    Japan's National Science Museum is no stranger to eerily human androids: It employs two in its exhibition hall already. But for a week, they're getting a new colleague. Called "Alter," it has a very human face like Professor Ishiguro's Geminoids, but goes one step further with an embedded neural network that allows it to move itself. The technology powering this involves 42 pneumatic actuators and, most importantly, a "central pattern generator." That CPG has a neutral network that replicates neurons, allowing the robot to create movement patterns of its own, influenced by sensors that detect proximity, temperature and, for some reason, humidity. The setup doesn't make for human-like movement, but it gives the viewer the very strange sensation that this particular robot is somehow alive. And that's precisely the point.

  • Christian Hubicki/Georgia Tech

    Georgia Tech's DURUS robot has a more natural human-like stride

    by 
    Billy Steele
    Billy Steele
    07.12.2016

    Last time we saw the DURUS robot walking like a human, it was still doing so relatively flat footed. The folks at Georgia Tech's AMBER-Lab have improved the robot's movements to incorporate even more human-like heel strikes and push-offs. As you can see in the video below, the new range of motion gives DURUS a more natural stride, and the ability to wear some sweet sneakers. Until about a week ago, the robot shuffled along flat footed before getting a pair of new metal feet with arches soles. After some tweaking of the algorithms and a few falls, DURUS now strides like the rest of us.

  • Meet the faces of Japan's first robot-staffed hotel

    by 
    Mat Smith
    Mat Smith
    07.15.2015

    Japan's first robot-staffed hotel opens this week and we just got the full tour. While the main attraction may be the bordering-on-human receptionist (left) and the English-speaking dinosaur (er, right), the hotel has a whole family of robots performing varying degrees of useful work. Think: room service and a luggage porter, with one familiar face taking up duties as a bilingual concierge. A deeper dive of the hotel is coming; the robots aren't the only curiosity found inside this hotel. For now, let's meet the bots.

  • The bots that bucked the humanoid trend at DARPA's challenge

    by 
    Mona Lalwani
    Mona Lalwani
    06.18.2015

    #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-897542{display:none;} .cke_show_borders #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-897542, #postcontentcontainer #fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-897542{width:570px;display:block;} try{document.getElementById("fivemin-widget-blogsmith-image-897542").style.display="none";}catch(e){} Humanoids are supposed to be best suited for a world that's engineered for humans. They can climb stairs, open doors and drive cars. At DARPA Robotics Challenge, most of the participating humanoids succeeded in completing those tasks, but when it came to walking, they were clumsier than the species they were designed to emulate. Getting a machine to put one foot in front of the other has been a priority for roboticists for decades. Bipedal locomotion would presumably make it easier for robots to navigate a man-made world and perhaps make them more relatable. But the movement requires sophisticated control software and advanced AI technology that isn't quite ready yet.

  • US Navy's firefighting robot finally appears (with a trusty sidekick)

    by 
    Mariella Moon
    Mariella Moon
    02.05.2015

    SAFFiR, the humanoid firefighting robot that the US Navy and Virginia Tech engineers have been developing for years, is now more than just a blueprint. In fact, the military division has already demonstrated what the biped can do aboard one of its decommissioned ships. During a series of tests conducted in November 2014, it worked well enough to navigate uneven floors (extremely difficult for humanoid machines), identify equipment using thermal imaging and handle a hose to put out small fires. The Shipboard Autonomous Firefighting Robot did need a bit of help from a sidekick, though. No, not the firefighting snakebot Anna Konda (which is unfortunate, if you think they're the perfect pair), but a small drone created by Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute.

  • Kids with disabilities can teach this robot how to play 'Angry Birds'

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    07.10.2014

    As a way to help children dealing with cognitive and motor-skill disabilities, researchers from Georgia Tech have developed a rehabilitation tool that pairs a robot and an Android tablet. To demonstrate this system in action, the research team used Angry Birds to let kids teach the humanoid how to play Rovio's popular game. Essentially, the robot is smart enough to learn by simply watching each move the child makes while flinging those birds toward the iconic green pigs. "The robot is able to learn by watching because it knows how interaction with a tablet app is supposed to work," writes project leader Ayanna Howard, a professor at Georgia Tech. "It recognizes that a person touched here and ended there, then deciphers the information that is important and relevant to its progress."

  • Are you ready for your first home robot? Meet Pepper

    by 
    Mat Smith
    Mat Smith
    06.12.2014

    The path to mainstream home robots is strewn with the battery-drained corpses of AIBO and lesser-known, Dalek-esque robots like Wakamaru. But now Japan's SoftBank, flush from the purchase of Sprint, has introduced its robot game changer, teaming up with Aldebaran Robotics (the team behind NAO) to make sure it gets it right. This is Pepper-kun. He's adorable... and a bit of a ditz. Is it finally time, like it was for the home PC, for the home robot revolution?

  • Japanese robot gets better at not running into people

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    03.11.2014

    Hitachi is taking Asimov's I Robot law about not harming humans more seriously with new tweaks to its wheeled Emiew 2 bot. The 30-pound humanoid now packs a sensor that'll measure walking speeds (in an office, for instance) and generate mapping data to predict where someone might pop up unexpectedly. It'll then avoid those areas or slow down so as not to roll into your kneecaps. Given Emiew's 31-inch frame and 4 mph speed, we weren't too worried anyway -- there are other, decidedly more terrifying robots to avoid.