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  • WASHINGTON, D.C., Dec. 20, 2020 -- Photo taken on Dec. 20, 2020 shows the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C., the United States. The U.S. Congress on Sunday passed another stopgap funding bill to avert a government shutdown and provide lawmakers more time to vote on the COVID-19 relief deal and long-term government funding. 
   Earlier in the day, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that lawmakers have just reached an agreement on the long-awaited COVID-19 relief package, and will pass the bill as soon as possible. (Photo by Ting Shen/Xinhua via Getty) (Xinhua/Ting Shen via Getty Images)

    Congress approves COVID-19 spending bill with contentious copyright measures

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    12.22.2020

    US Congress has finally passed a new spending bill with COVID-19 relief measures, which on the one hand is good news for many Americans. As often happens with crucial legislation, however, lawmakers tacked on extra legislation, including felony streaming measures and a controversial copyright bill called the CASE Act.

  • An Apple iPhone 11 smartphone with the Twitch video streaming app logo on screen, taken on January 27, 2020. (Photo by Phil Barker/Future Publishing via Getty Images)

    Twitch urges streamers not to use copyrighted music

    by 
    Kris Holt
    Kris Holt
    11.11.2020

    The service apologized for how it handled a huge influx of DMCA claims.

  • UKRAINE - 2020/10/04: In this photo illustration a Twitch (service) by Amazon.com, Inc. logo is seen displayed on a smartphone. (Photo Illustration by Igor Golovniov/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

    Twitch faces music industry backlash over proper licensing (updated)

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    10.26.2020

    The RIAA and other music industry groups have written a letter to Twitch complaining that the service isn't licensing their songs.

  • Side view of female freelancer photographer checking photos on a digital camera while sitting at the table in workstation.freelancer photographer

    Facebook is testing a tool to let users claim image rights

    by 
    Christine Fisher
    Christine Fisher
    09.21.2020

    Facebook's Rights Manager of Images could make it easier for creators to issue takedown requests.

  • Close-up image of software engineer typing on laptop

    An OnlyFans creator is suing a site that hosts paywalled images for free

    by 
    Christine Fisher
    Christine Fisher
    08.04.2020

    OnlyFans creators Deniece Waidhofer is suing Thothub for spreading her images without consent.

  • LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 26:  Mason Mount of Chelsea in action during the Premier League match between Chelsea FC and Wolverhampton Wanderers at Stamford Bridge on July 26, 2020 in London, United Kingdom. (Photo by Craig Mercer/MB Media/Getty Images)

    UK soccer stars may sue betting companies over player data profits

    by 
    Daniel Cooper
    Daniel Cooper
    07.27.2020

    Can a team of UK-based footballers get money for their athletic data?

  • game streaming

    Twitch streamers receive a flood of music copyright claims for old clips

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    06.08.2020

    Twitch streamers have received a deluge of DMCA takedown requests over music in old clips, risking bans unless they take actions that may not be realistic.

  • Bookshelves and laptops are placed on the library desk.E-learning class and e-book digital technology

    Book publishers sue Internet Archive for allegedly enabling piracy

    by 
    Christine Fisher
    Christine Fisher
    06.01.2020

    Four major publishers filed a lawsuit against the Internet Archive for alleged “willful mass copyright infringement" related to its Open Library.

  • This photo taken on April 29, 2020 shows Australian high school teacher Dante Gabriele playing Nintendo's Animal Crossing at home in Melbourne during the country's enforced COVID-19 coronavirus lockdown. - The leisurely world of Nintendo's latest release "Animal Crossing: New Horizons" has struck a chord with gamers around the world, many of them yearning for a virtual escape from the onerous restrictions on movement and social activity brought on to contain the infection. (Photo by William WEST / AFP) / TO GO WITH Health-virus-games-Nintendo-entertainment,FOCUS by Sean Gleeson and Erwan Lucas (Photo by WILLIAM WEST/AFP via Getty Images)

    Nintendo takes legal action against US Switch hack sellers

    by 
    Rachel England
    Rachel England
    05.19.2020

    Nintendo has filed new lawsuits against Switch hackers in the US.

  • Super Mario 64

    'Super Mario 64' fan releases a fully playable port for PC

    by 
    Rachel England
    Rachel England
    05.05.2020

    A fully-functional 4K port of 'Super Mario 64' for the PC has appeared online.

  • @Piece_of_Craft

    ‘Dreams’ player forced to remove his fan-made Mario assets

    by 
    Rachel England
    Rachel England
    03.23.2020

    Sony's long-awaited Dreams arrived earlier this year, a LittleBigPlanet-esque wonderland in which players can build almost any kind of world they can imagine -- but only if it doesn't infringe on copyright, apparently. According to Dreams content creator @Piece_of_Craft, "a big video game company" has come after him for his use of Nintendo's Super Mario character on the platform.

  • Ridofranz via Getty Images

    Lawsuits claim Amazon, Apple and more are streaming unlicensed music

    by 
    Marc DeAngelis
    Marc DeAngelis
    01.29.2020

    When you walk into a bar, hotel or store, you probably hear music. The same goes for when you tune into a TV channel or radio station. Those businesses are supposed to pay royalties to the artists for using their music. Collection firms like Pro Music Rights (PMR) are tasked with monitoring these things. And they've had a lot more work on their hands, now that they need to keep track of streaming services which must properly license the songs they add to their libraries. PMR -- which sued Spotify last year -- alleges that 10 of the biggest services have been streaming unlicensed music from artists the company represents, and has filed lawsuits against each.

  • Emmanuele Contini/NurPhoto via Getty Images

    UK won't implement EU's contentious digital copyright law

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    01.26.2020

    The UK may borrow some aspects of European Union law after Brexit, but the approach to digital copyright won't one of them. Universities and Science Minister Chris Skidmore has indicated that the UK won't implement the EU's Copyright Directive once it's out of the Union on January 31st. This will let British internet companies and users avoid contentious aspects like Article 13 (renamed Article 17), which requires that sites check all uploaded content for copyrighted material. The EU had softened the requirement to allow memes and other content that offers "quotation, criticism, review, caricature, parody and pastiche," but this would eliminate the requirement entirely in the UK.

  • Anatoliy Sizov via Getty Images

    YouTube makes it easier for creators to address copyright claims

    by 
    Marc DeAngelis
    Marc DeAngelis
    12.26.2019

    YouTube's copyright claims system can be a headache for creators. Content ID -- the platform's automated cross-checking system -- is often overzealous in demonetizing or removing videos. Plus, filing disputes against erroneous claims isn't a clear-cut process and gives copyright holders the final say in most situations. YouTube has made things a bit easier for creators with an update to the YouTube Studio Dashboard, though. Users now have a clearer view of which videos contain copyrighted material and have the option to quickly remove the offending sections.

  • Thomas Trutschel via Getty Images

    YouTube reportedly considered screening all YouTube Kids videos

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    12.26.2019

    YouTube paid the FTC a $170 million fine this year, which was pocket change for Google. However, the charge of violating the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act will remain a very costly stain on its reputation. In fact, things got so bad for YouTube when it came to kids last year that the site reportedly considered individual screening for every YouTube Kids video, according to Bloomberg.

  • Disney

    Adorable 'Baby Yoda' GIFs return after Giphy mix-up

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    11.25.2019

    One of the most relentlessly adorable characters in Star Wars history just got caught up in some copyright confusion. Giphy has restored GIFs of Disney+ series The Mandalorian's stand-out character The Child (nicknamed "baby Yoda" because... well, look at him) after "confusion" over whether or not the animations were allowed. Vulture claimed in a spoiler-laden piece that the GIFs of the cute-as-hell character were taken down for "copyright reasons," but Giphy has stressed that Disney wasn't responsible. Giphy only pulled the snippets temporarily while it "reviewed the situation," the company said in a statement to the BBC.

  • REUTERS/Marko Djurica

    Google's fight with Oracle will be heard in the Supreme Court

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    11.16.2019

    Google is getting one more shot at fending off Oracle's Android copyright claims. The US Supreme Court has agreed to hear Google's appeal of a federal appeals court ruling that Android violated Oracle copyright by using Java code without a license. The appeal will also address a 2014 decision that programing can be copyrighted. A decision is expected by July.

  • REUTERS/Manaure Quintero

    Adobe, Twitter and the New York Times team up to fight digital fakes

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    11.04.2019

    Adobe, Twitter and the New York Times are tired of seeing fake media propagate, and they're teaming up to do something about it. The trio has launched a Content Authenticity Initiative that aims to create a standard for digital media attribution. Ideally, you'd know whether or not a picture or video is legitimate simply by examining the file -- you'd know if it had been manipulated.

  • boonchai wedmakawand via Getty Images

    House passes controversial copyright bill that could be abused by trolls

    by 
    Christine Fisher
    Christine Fisher
    10.23.2019

    Yesterday, the House of Representatives voted in favor (410-6) of a controversial copyright bill known as the Copyright Alternative in Small-Claims Enforcement Act of 2019, or CASE Act. The bill is meant to give independent creators an affordable and accessible way to defend their intellectual property. But critics question whether it is constitutional and argue that it could be abused by trolls, potentially bankrupting the creators it's meant to benefit.

  • ALASTAIR PIKE via Getty Images

    Twitter temporarily banned pro-Trump meme creator Carpe Donktum

    by 
    Christine Fisher
    Christine Fisher
    10.14.2019

    This afternoon, Twitter caused a stir when it suspended the prolific pro-Trump meme creator, Carpe Donktum. People were quick to speculate that Carpe Donktum was suspended for his alleged connection to the violent video shown at Trump's Miami resort last week. But after his account was restored, Donktum shared a video stating that he was suspended over a copyright infringement claim.