recall

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  • Bloomberg via Getty Images

    US regulators recall refurbished Galaxy Note 4 batteries

    by 
    Mallory Locklear
    Mallory Locklear
    08.16.2017

    The Galaxy Note line is having problems again. Don't worry, this is not a Note 7-level emergency. And the issues aren't Samsung's fault or even associated with the original phone model. However, batteries installed in refurbished Note 4 phones by FedEx Supply Chain and distributed through AT&T's insurance program could overheat and are now being recalled.

  • MixBin

    Glittery iPhone cases recalled after reports of chemical burns

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    08.02.2017

    Smartphone cases are normally as harmless as can be, but that sadly isn't always true. MixBin has recalled 263,000 iPhone cases after 24 reports of skin irritation and chemical burns when the cases broke, leaking glitter and liquid everywhere. And these aren't obscure cases, either. They've been sold at retailers like Amazon, Nordstrom Rack, Tory Burch and Victoria's Secret as recently as June, so there's a real chance you picked one up.

  • RyanJLane via Getty Images

    Honeywell recalls fire alarm gateway that can't detect fires

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    05.14.2017

    Tech-savvy fire alarm systems aren't without their share of problems, it seems. Honeywell is recalling its SWIFT wireless gateway after learning that the smoke detectors connected to the gateway (usually found in apartments, hotels and offices) won't always kick in -- in other words, they can't accomplish their one and only mission. The company hasn't received reports of real-world incidents and is offering a firmware update as a fix, but it clearly doesn't want to take any chances.

  • Scott Olson/Getty Images

    Fiat Chrysler software error leads to a massive truck recall

    by 
    Mariella Moon
    Mariella Moon
    05.13.2017

    Fiat Chrysler is currently in the midst of notifying over a million people that they need to turn in the trucks they bought from the company due to a potentially dangerous software error. The automaker has announced a massive recall affecting 1.02 million 2013 to 2016 Ram 1500 and 2500, as well as 2014 to 2016 Ram 3500 pickups in the US. Chrysler's problem goes beyond the US: it's also recalling 216,007 vehicles in Canada, 21,668 in Mexico and 21,530 outside North America altogether. In the notification published on its website, the company admitted that it's "aware of one fatality, two injuries and two accidents that may be related" to its software troubles.

  • Arnd Wiegmann / Reuters

    Tesla recalls 53,000 vehicles for potential parking brake issue

    by 
    David Lumb
    David Lumb
    04.20.2017

    Tesla is recalling 53,000 of its Model X and Model S vehicles built between February and October 2016. Some of these might have a manufacturing flaw that prevents the electronic parking brake from being switched off. While it hasn't been linked to safety issues or accidents yet, the cautious automaker is voluntarily recalling a large number of vehicles just to be safe.

  • CPSC

    Energizer's Xbox One battery charger recalled for burn hazard

    by 
    David Lumb
    David Lumb
    03.15.2017

    Faulty parts in tech devices have always threatened a particularly explosive calamity, but the last year has seen recalls for a bizarre range of devices that set themselves on fire. Top of the list: HP laptop batteries, Samsung's washing machines and 2016's biggest fail punchline, the Note 7. The latest device to get a recall notice is Energizer's double controller battery rechargers for the Xbox One, which is reportedly overheating so badly that it's melted the plastic casing on a few dozen units.

  • NurPhoto via Getty Images

    Daimler recalls one million Mercedes after dozens catch fire

    by 
    Andrew Dalton
    Andrew Dalton
    03.03.2017

    German automaker Daimler AG announced a major worldwide auto recall today, encompassing one million recent models of Mercedes-Benz vehicles that are at risk of catching fire due to a potentially faulty fuse. So far, 51 vehicle fires have be reported, but there have been no reported injuries or deaths.

  • KAZUHIRO NOGI via Getty Images

    Takata pleads guilty to fraud in faulty airbag cover-up

    by 
    Andrew Dalton
    Andrew Dalton
    02.27.2017

    Japanese auto parts maker Takata has formally pled guilty in federal court today to a criminal fraud charge stemming from its cover-up of millions of faulty airbags. As part of the guilty plea, Takata admitted it intentionally hid the fact that its airbag inflators could explode and throw hot metal shrapnel into drivers' faces.

  • MENAHEM KAHANA via Getty Images

    SodaStream recalls 51,000 bottles because they might explode

    by 
    Andrew Dalton
    Andrew Dalton
    02.21.2017

    Your greatest SodaStream fears have been realized: tens of thousands of SodaStream's plastic bottles may not be able to withstand quite as much pressure as the company thought, causing the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission to issue a recall because they pose an injury risk to carbonation-happy consumers. Some 51,000 bottles sold in the US and another 7,600 bottles sold in Canada are included in the recall because they could potentially explode under pressure -- either while pumping them full of CO2 or simply by shaking a full, carbonated bottle.

  • Samsung

    Samsung will reportedly sell 'refurbished' Galaxy Note 7s

    by 
    Richard Lawler
    Richard Lawler
    02.21.2017

    Even though Samsung has established a cause for those Galaxy Note 7 flare-ups, the device's story is not over. Korean outlet Hankyung reports that the company will sell the "refurbished" phones, but with smaller, less-explodey batteries inside. It doesn't sound like the devices will be returning to US or European markets (it's tough to imagine regulators reversing course on bans after the first recall and reissue), but they could be sold in India or Vietnam instead.

  • Getty

    HP recalls 101,000 laptop batteries due to fire concerns

    by 
    Mariella Moon
    Mariella Moon
    01.25.2017

    HP is asking the owners of some laptop models to send their batteries in for a replacement to make sure their devices don't catch fire. The US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has issued a notice about the recall, which affects around 101,000 computers. Those who have HP, Compaq, HP ProBook, HP ENVY, Compaq Presario and HP Pavilion laptops purchased between March 2013 and October 2016 may want to check their lithium-ion battery. If its bar code starts with 6BZLU, 6CGFK, 6CGFQ, 6CZMB, 6DEMA, 6DEMH, 6DGAL or 6EBVA, the company says the best course of action is to pull it out and contact HP for a free replacement.

  • AP Photo/Lee Jin-man

    With its Note 7 apology, Samsung finally gets something right

    by 
    Chris Velazco
    Chris Velazco
    01.24.2017

    After the furor over flaming phones had mostly subsided, Samsung moved to end the Note 7 fiasco once and for all. Last Sunday, Samsung mobile chief DJ Koh -- along with a cadre of technical experts -- laid out exactly what caused the company's incredibly well-received phone to fail so spectacularly. In doing so, he sought to move Samsung past the mess that had consumed it for the past five months.

  • Kim Hong-Ji / Reuters

    Samsung blames two different battery flaws for the Note 7 fires

    by 
    Chris Velazco
    Chris Velazco
    01.22.2017

    Well, after months of speculation, Samsung has finally announced the results of its Galaxy Note 7 investigation. The official line: those fires were caused by two distinct battery flaws (just as a recent report suggested), not a hardware or software issue. The first flaw had to do with how the Note 7's original batteries were manufactured: their casings were too small to safely fit the electrode assembly inside, which led to short-circuiting.

  • Kim Hong-Ji / Reuters

    Samsung will explain the Galaxy Note 7 explosions Sunday night

    by 
    Richard Lawler
    Richard Lawler
    01.19.2017

    As Reuters had suggested, Samsung is close to holding a press conference where it will "announce the cause of the Galaxy Note 7 incidents and quality enhancement plan." The event is being held on Monday morning (local time) in Seoul, Korea, and will be livestreamed in English on Samsung.com. If you'd like to tune in, set your alarm for 8PM ET on January 22nd. It seems likely that the battery will take the blame, as customers and regulators alike are waiting to find out what Samsung has planned to make sure this never happens again.

  • AP Photo/Lee Jin-man

    Report: Samsung's Note 7 probe points blame at batteries

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    01.16.2017

    Samsung has concluded that the Galaxy Note 7's fires and explosions were caused by battery problems, not the phone's hardware or software, Reuters reports. The information comes from "a person familiar with the matter," rather than an official source, but Samsung will reportedly release the full results from its investigation on January 23rd. To assuage nervous buyers, Samsung mobile chief Koh Dong-jin will likely also detail steps it's taking to prevent similar problems with the Galaxy S8 and other future devices.

  • Reuters

    A visual history of gadgets that have burst into flames

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    01.15.2017

    Samsung had a rough 2016. Last year, the company had to recall its Galaxy Note 7 after units were catching fire, followed by millions of washing machines that were exploding in people's homes. But Samsung isn't the only company that's struggled recently with faulty batteries. We've seen similar issues with hoverboards, a Tesla Model S and the latest electric skateboard from Boosted. Let's take a look at other products that have had trouble in the flammability department. And let's hope those non-exploding lithium Ion batteries get here soon.

  • Getty

    Three Takata executives charged in global airbag scandal

    by 
    Andrew Tarantola
    Andrew Tarantola
    01.13.2017

    It's official: The US Department of Justice has indicted three Takata Corporation executives -- Shinichi Tanaka, Hideo Nakajima and Tsuneo Chikaraishi -- on charges that they knowingly falsified safety reports in an effort to continue selling airbags the company knew were unsafe. The DoJ is also expected to announce that the company will plead guilty to criminal misconduct charges, though that announcement has not yet been formally made.

  • GoPro will outline the Karma drone's future in February

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    01.05.2017

    GoPro has mostly been silent about its Karma drone's return following a recall in November, but it's finally ready to start talking... well, almost. The action camera maker has revealed that it will detail the Karma's worldwide relaunch sometime in early February. GoPro isn't saying much at this point, but it's close to completing its investigation of the Karma's power loss issues and expects the robotic flyer to hit shelves in 2017. Vague, we know.

  • Chris Velazco/Engadget; logo by L-Dopa

    Samsung's 2016 went up in smoke

    by 
    Chris Velazco
    Chris Velazco
    12.27.2016

    Samsung's year started well, all things considered. The Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge were bona fide hits. The company's financials looked great. Its position as the global leader in the smartphone market was assured. And then the Galaxy Note 7 happened. After months of success, Samsung's year started to unravel -- quickly.

  • Samsung will disable remaining US Note 7s with software update (updated)

    by 
    Billy Steele
    Billy Steele
    12.09.2016

    Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 recall in the US is still ongoing, but the company will release an update in a couple of weeks that will basically force customers to return any devices that may still be in use. The company announced today that a December 19th update to the handsets in the States will prevent them from charging at all and "will eliminate their ability to work as mobile devices." In other words, if you still have a Note 7, it will soon be completely useless.