recall

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  • Will Lipman / Engadget

    Apple replacing a small number of iPhone 6s batteries

    by 
    Daniel Cooper
    Daniel Cooper
    11.21.2016

    Apple has let a cat out of its bag, the cat in this case being that there's a problem with some iPhone 6s models. According to the company, a fault with the battery is causing a "very small number" of handsets to randomly shut down. If you're rocking a device that was manufactured between September and October 2015, then you're eligible for a replacement. Simply head down to your local Apple Store or authorized service provider to have your serial number checked and, if you qualify, you'll get a replacement battery.

  • GoPro compensates Karma buyers with free Hero5 cameras

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    11.20.2016

    We won't blame you if you're upset that GoPro had to recall your Karma drone over sudden power losses, but at least you're getting compensation for your trouble. GoPro is offering American Karma buyers a free Hero5 Black camera once they return both their drones and the accessories that came with them. That's on top of the full refund during the investigation, we'd add. While this won't completely make up for having to go droneless (or, gasp, look for an alternative), you won't have to go empty-handed -- and GoPro won't have to worry so much about customers holding on to their Karmas at all costs.

  • GoPro recalls all Karma drones over safety concerns

    by 
    Timothy J. Seppala
    Timothy J. Seppala
    11.08.2016

    If you recently picked up one of GoPro's long-in-the-works Karma drones, you should probably return it. The company has issued a recall for all devices (around 2,500 according to internal estimates) because "in a very small number of cases" the Karmas lost power while in use. Exchanges won't be offered, and GoPro says to take your device back to the point of purchase for a full refund. Once the issue has been worked out, shipment and sales of the drone will resume.

  • Shawn L. Minter via AP

    Software update will annoy Galaxy Note 7 owners into a return

    by 
    Richard Lawler
    Richard Lawler
    11.04.2016

    While Samsung continues its quest to retrieve every Galaxy Note 7, a software update that reduces how much the phone's battery can be charged is finally rolling out in the US. Even though it's still apparently unclear exactly what caused so many of the phones to overheat, smoke and/or start fires, the idea is that this will increase participation in the recall. Another "feature" of the update is a system of pop-up notifications about the recall anytime an owner reboots, charges or turns on the screen of the device

  • REUTERS/Steve Marcus

    Samsung recalls 2.8 million top-loading washing machines

    by 
    Matt Brian
    Matt Brian
    11.04.2016

    No company likes to issue a product recall, but Samsung is having to deal with its fair share as of late. After going some way to reduce the damage following the disastrous launch of the Galaxy Note 7, the company has today made the headlines again after issuing an urgent recall on 2.8 million top-loading washing machines.

  • You can still buy the Note 7 in Hong Kong, but you shouldn't

    by 
    Richard Lai
    Richard Lai
    10.24.2016

    Hong Kong's Sincere Podium is home to all manner of mobile devices -- be it second-hand phones, imported handsets (mainly from Japan and Korea), spare parts and even prototypes once in a while. This time, the mall appears to be the last place in the city -- if not the world -- to still be openly selling the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 despite the worldwide recall. Over the weekend, I came across a shop with a glass cabinet full of boxes for the 64GB Note 7, with a bright sticker on one of them saying "Samsung Note 7 dealer goods: special offer" in Chinese. I didn't think much of it and simply tweeted a couple of photos, only to be surprised by the posts' traction over the last two days.

  • Getty Images

    Vulnerable webcams used in major internet attack recalled

    by 
    Nathan Ingraham
    Nathan Ingraham
    10.24.2016

    This past Friday, some of the biggest sites and services on the internet were effectively shut down by a major distributed denial of service attack (DDoS). As the day wore on, it was revealed that hacked Internet of Things devices like webcams and other connected home devices were the tools used to carry out the attack, and now at least some of the hacked devices are being recalled. The BBC reports that Chinese manufacturer Hangzhou Xiongmai has issued a recall for its faulty webcams that were involved in the attack.

  • Reuters

    Samsung's hurried Galaxy Note 7 recall doomed the phone

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    10.23.2016

    You knew it was just a matter of time before some of the drama behind the death of the Galaxy Note 7 came to light, and what we're seeing isn't all that pretty. Wall Street Journal sources claim that Samsung's mobile chief DJ Koh thought there was enough evidence (protrusions in the batteries from one supplier) to go ahead with the speedy initial recall. He thought it was best to do "the right thing" and start a recall, insiders say, even though there was incomplete evidence. The company didn't want to leave people in the dark, worrying what was wrong. And while there was a debate about the seriousness of the issue (some even suspected the fires were fake), it's not as if Koh was a lone wolf. Company heir and vice chairman Lee Jae-yong was also in favor of the hasty recall, possibly due to his push for greater transparency at a company known for its secrecy.

  • Soylent recalls its food bars after making some customers sick

    by 
    Mat Smith
    Mat Smith
    10.13.2016

    You probably shouldn't eat one of Soylent's recently-launched food bars. The company is halting sales, and recalling existing bars following reports of of customers getting sick after eating its latest future-food. People have reported feeling nauseous, vomiting and even diarrhea.

  • Samsung offers Note 7 owners $100 off another Galaxy phone

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    10.13.2016

    In an attempt to keep users, Samsung is issuing a $100 credit to exchange the defective Galaxy Note 7 for a Galaxy S7 Edge or other Samsung device. By comparison, it'll give you just $25 if you switch to Apple, HTC or any other brand. It has also expanded the recall to include all Galaxy Note 7 devices, including those issued as replacements for the original defective phones. That move was expected, since both have proved to have defective batteries that can cause fires and explosions.

  • Reuters/Kim Hong-Ji

    US couriers issue strict guidelines for returning your Galaxy Note 7

    by 
    Mariella Moon
    Mariella Moon
    10.13.2016

    If you can't walk into your carrier's store to turn in a Galaxy Note 7 in person, you'll have to ask them for Samsung's fire-proof box and wait for it to come in. FedEx and UPS have announced that they won't ship out the phone unless it's inside one of the special containers Samsung has prepared for it. This container is actually comprised of several boxes you'll have to stack like a Russian doll, though the outermost one is lined with ceramic fiber designed to keep potential fires under control. Meanwhile, the US Postal Service will accept your shipment, so long as it's inside hard cardboard or plastic boxes.

  • AP Photo/Lee Jin-man

    NYT: Samsung engineers can't replicate Galaxy Note 7 problems

    by 
    Richard Lawler
    Richard Lawler
    10.11.2016

    Even though Galaxy Note 7 production has shut down and the phones should be on their way back to Samsung in fireproof boxes, the question of how everything went so wrong has yet to be answered. When it initiated a recall on September 2nd, the company said that "we conducted a thorough investigation and found a battery cell issue." However, today when it announced a permanent end to manufacturing, there was no word on the problem. A report by the New York Times indicates that despite assigning "hundreds" of employees, they have not been able to reproduce the spontaneously smoky, blazing hot phones too many customers have experienced.

  • @Bkiplal/Twitter

    Samsung ships fire-proof boxes and gloves to recover Note 7s

    by 
    Chris Velazco
    Chris Velazco
    10.11.2016

    If you purchased a Galaxy Note 7 from a US carrier or retailer, you can (and should) return it to a store immediately. If you bought the phone straight from Samsung, though, the process was a little trickier -- some customers complained early on about FedEx and UPS refusing to handle return units out of fears they would blow up. That's why Samsung has adopted an elaborate recall box that allows affected phones to be returned to the company via UPS Ground. It's... sort of a doozy.

  • Samsung ends production of the Galaxy Note 7 for good

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    10.11.2016

    Samsung has "permanently discontinued" production of the Galaxy Note 7, the company told Engadget in a short statement. Sales of the flagship phone were halted yesterday because replacements for the original, recalled model were still catching fire and exploding. Shortly after it started doing exchanges, the updated models were involved in several serious fires, causing the evacuation of a Southwest Airlines flight and a fire that sent a Kentucky owner to hospital with smoke inhalation.

  • Samsung's Note 7 catches fire, but the damage isn't done

    by 
    Chris Velazco
    Chris Velazco
    10.10.2016

    When Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 launched earlier in the fall, we loved it. So did a lot of others, critics and consumers alike. Then the reports of battery-related fires started rolling in. Just weeks later, Samsung was forced to kick off a massive recall of Note 7s, a complicated, crucially important process that should have signaled the end of this disaster. It didn't. Now we're left with reports of replacement units going up in smoke -- one of them started smoldering on a Southwest flight, and another put a Kentucky man in the hospital for smoke inhalation. Then, during the writing of this very sentence, Samsung told all of its carrier and retail partners around the world to stop sales and exchanges of Galaxy Note 7s. It's the move Samsung dreaded, and the move Samsung needed. As dramatic as this seems, though, it's just another step in its fight to piece its reputation back together, bit by agonizing bit.

  • 16. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji/File Photo

    Samsung stops Galaxy Note 7 sales, owners should 'power down'

    by 
    Richard Lawler
    Richard Lawler
    10.10.2016

    That's it for the Galaxy Note 7 -- Samsung just issued a statement saying it's asking "all global partners to stop sales and exchanges of Galaxy Note 7 while further investigation takes place." That includes both original and devices issued as replacements, matching a rumor from last night that Samsung had, in conjunction with consumer safety organizations from several countries, decided to stop manufacturing the phone.

  • REUTERS/Luke MacGregor/File Photo

    Samsung reportedly halts Galaxy Note 7 production (update: confirmed)

    by 
    Richard Lawler
    Richard Lawler
    10.09.2016

    After more reports of replacement Galaxy Note 7 phones catching fire, Yonhap News reports that Samsung has temporarily suspended production. The Korean paper cited an anonymous source working at one of Samsung's suppliers, and the company has not yet commented. Already, AT&T and T-Mobile have said they will stop Galaxy Note 7 sales and replacements while investigations into the incidents continue.

  • Reuters/Kim Hong-Ji

    Bloomberg: AT&T considering a halt on Galaxy Note 7 sales

    by 
    Richard Lawler
    Richard Lawler
    10.07.2016

    Reports that a Galaxy Note 7 issued as a replacement caught fire on an airplane may be too much for at least one carrier. Bloomberg cites a single unnamed source claiming that AT&T is "considering" stopping sales of the troubled phone based on that incident. Although AT&T (along with Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon) have already issued statements indicating that customers can return or exchange their replacement phones, this would go a step further. The rumored deadline for the decision is Friday, which would put pressure on Samsung to figure out what's going here.

  • US carriers exchange replacement Note 7s after airplane incident (updated)

    by 
    Billy Steele
    Billy Steele
    10.07.2016

    A replacement Samsung Galaxy Note 7 started smoking and burned through the carpet on board a Southwest flight this week. Following the incident, one US carrier is allowing owners to exchange those replacement devices even though the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) hasn't issued a formal warning or recall yet. Sprint confirmed to Engadget it will allow customers to return their replacement Note 7 for another device at its retail stores "during the investigation window." The carrier says that it's working with Samsung "to better understand the most recent concerns" with the handset.

  • Replacement Note 7 starts smoking on Southwest flight (updated)

    by 
    Billy Steele
    Billy Steele
    10.05.2016

    A Southwest flight was evacuated in Lousiville, Kentucky when a Samsung Galaxy Note 7 overheated and began smoking on board. Louisville Metro Arson investigators confirmed to WAVE News 3 that a Samsung device was the cause of the incident. All passengers and crew members exited the plane safely via the main cabin door and no injuries were reported. To make matters worse, the device was a replacement following the company's global recall of the handset over the last few weeks.