WWDC 2024

Apple's annual developer conference typically showcases updates to iOS, iPadOS, watchOS, macOS and more. The company sometimes surprises us with new hardware, too. Apple's WWDC 2024 keynote kicks off on Monday, June 10.

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  • London, UK - July 24, 2018: The buttons of Podcasts, WhatsApp, Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter, Snapchat and other apps on the screen of an iPhone.

    Apple Podcasts may get personalized recommendations in iOS 14

    by 
    Ann Smajstrla
    Ann Smajstrla
    06.18.2020

    The leak comes ahead of the virtual WWDC next Monday, where Apple is expected to reveal more about iOS 14. Apple Podcasts will learn from your listening preferences and suggest new podcasts.

  • iOS

    What to expect from Apple's online-only WWDC 2020

    by 
    Chris Velazco
    Chris Velazco
    06.18.2020

    Apple's leap to ARM There hasn't been a whole lot of noise about macOS this year, and for once, that might be because Apple's Mac hardware announcements are far more important.

  • Apple Worldwide Developer Conference promo image

    Apple's virtual WWDC keynote starts on June 22nd at 1 PM ET

    by 
    Kris Holt
    Kris Holt
    06.11.2020

    This year's online-only edition of the conference is free to 'all developers.'

  •           Apple may unveil plans to switch Macs away from Intel chips at WWDC

    Apple may unveil its ARM-based Mac processors at WWDC this month

    by 
    Steve Dent
    Steve Dent
    06.09.2020

    For a couple of years now, it’s been rumored that Apple might replace Intel processors in its Mac PCs with its own chips, a move that would cause a seismic shift in the PC industry. Apple may finally confirm that news as early as this month at its WWDC developer conference, according to Bloomberg.

  • iOS

    Apple's online-only WWDC starts on June 22nd, and it's free

    by 
    Chris Velazco
    Chris Velazco
    05.05.2020

    Shelter-in-place orders and limits on public gatherings forced Apple to cancel the in-person portion of its Worldwide Developers Conference, but the show will go on -- and now we know when. The company confirmed this morning that this year's online-only WWDC will begin on June 22nd, and will be available for free to “all developers” interested in tuning in. “WWDC20 will be our biggest yet, bringing together our global developer community of more than 23 million in an unprecedented way for a week in June to learn about the future of Apple platforms,” said Phil Schiller, Apple’s SVP of Worldwide Marketing in a press release.

  • Chris Velazco / Engadget

    Apple may have narrowed down the Mac Pro's release date (updated)

    by 
    Kris Holt
    Kris Holt
    06.10.2019

    The Mac Pro was one of the bigger announcements at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference last week, bringing with it immense power and an aesthetically questionable if practical design (it looks like a cheese grater instead of a trash can this time). Apple said it would release the machine in the fall, but it may have accidentally revealed the release month before it intended to.

  • iPadOS first look: Desktop-class browsing, better multitasking and more

    by 
    Chris Velazco
    Chris Velazco
    06.04.2019

    We knew Apple would make major changes to iOS on the iPad, but we didn't think the company would take things a step further and announce iPadOS. (Not until Apple quietly let the news slip ahead of its WWDC keynote, anyway.) Craig Federighi, Apple's SVP of software engineering, says the process of using the iPad has become a "truly distinct" experience, one that requires special attention beyond that which goes into phone-centric versions of iOS. Needless to say, iPads stand to gain a lot when this new software becomes available later this year.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Experts weigh in on Apple's private sign-in feature

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    06.04.2019

    Apple's WWDC 2019 was full of announcements, but few of them garnered as big a cheer from the crowd as when Sign in with Apple was introduced. The feature, which lets people use their Apple IDs to sign up for sites and services on the web, is being touted as a privacy-oriented alternative to Login with Facebook and Sign in with Google. "We've all seen buttons like this, asking us to use a social account login to get a more personalized experience with an app, and these logins can be used to track you," Craig Federighi, Apple's senior vice president of software engineering, said on Monday during the keynote. "We wanted to solve this, and many developers do too, and so now we have the solution."

  • iOS 13 first look: Dark mode, Maps and more

    by 
    Chris Velazco
    Chris Velazco
    06.04.2019

    A dark mode. A swipe-friendly keyboard. A slew of redesigned apps. These are just a few of the things you'll find in Apple's new iOS 13 release, but here's the rub: unless you're a developer, you can't actually try any of these new features until they become available in a public beta later this summer. (And even then, most of you will probably want to wait until iOS 13's official release this September.)

  • Apple

    iOS 13 beta mentions Apple’s Tile-like tracking device

    by 
    Christine Fisher
    Christine Fisher
    06.04.2019

    It appears Apple left one item out of its Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) yesterday: its Tile-like tracking device. Earlier this spring, we learned that Apple is supposedly working on a tracking tag, but the company didn't mention it amidst news of its updated operating systems, Mac Pro and HomeKit security improvements. However, in the iOS 13 beta, developers spotted an asset package for a device with the product type "Tag1,1." As 9to5Mac reports, that type of asset package is used for pairing devices by proximity -- like AirPods and HomePod. It's more evidence to support rumors that Apple is working on a tracking device.

  • Apple

    The new Mac Pro: What's changed?

    by 
    Kris Naudus
    Kris Naudus
    06.03.2019

    The last Mac Pro came out in 2013 and, while opinions on its trash can-shaped exterior were decidedly mixed, we couldn't fault it on its power. It delivered top of the line specs worthy of the most demanding creative projects, but after almost six years it's definitely time for an update, both inside and out. The new Mac Pro is bigger, boxier and looking a bit like the old Power Mac G5. But of course, it's way more powerful than any Mac we've ever seen. Just how powerful? Check out the specs below, stacked up against the 2013 model, to see how much heat this new "cheese grater" is packing.

  • Kayvon Beykpour (Twitter)

    The Twitter app is officially returning to the Mac later this year

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    06.03.2019

    More than a year after Twitter pulled the plug on its official app for the Mac, it looks like the company will be launching a new version for Apple PCs later this year. The application is being created as part of Apple's Project Catalyst, which lets developers easily port apps from iOS to the next major version of macOS, dubbed Catalina. Based on what Apple shared on stage at WWDC 2019, you should expect Twitter's Mac application to be quite similar to the version youu're using on your iPhone.

  • Chris Velazco/Engadget

    All you need to control your Mac or iOS device is your voice

    by 
    Billy Steele
    Billy Steele
    06.03.2019

    Accessibility has become a popular avenue for tech companies lately, and today Apple revealed its latest push: Voice Control. With macOS Catalina and iOS 13, you'll be able to control your devices completely with your voice. At WWDC, Apple showed that this can be used to do things like launch apps and select emoji thanks to a system of labels and grids. You can also ask it to simulate actions like a long press or access things typically done with swipe or gesture -- like the app switcher. Most importantly, the company says your voice is processed on the device. Nothing is sent to, or stored by, Apple.

  • iOS 13 makes it easier to browse, view and edit photos and videos

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    06.03.2019

    Aside from the introduction of that system-wide dark mode in iOS 13, Apple is also making it easier to browse, view and edit your photos and videos. At WWDC 2019, the company showed off a new version of its Photos app that's designed to "remove duplicates and clutter and focus on your best shots." Powered by machine learning, this feature will put your best shots front and center, and you can narrow them down by selecting the new Days, Months and Years tabs. With Days, for instance, the pictures or videos that system thinks you'll like the most will get more real estate on your screen. And you can pinch-to-zoom to view all of your pictures in one go, as well.

  • WWDC

    Apple adds system-wide dark mode for iOS 13

    by 
    Christine Fisher
    Christine Fisher
    06.03.2019

    As expected, Apple's newest mobile operating system, iOS 13, will include a system-wide dark mode. The company announced the change at its Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) today. While the feature has been circulating through the rumor mill for months, it's still one of the most notable changes to come out of this year's conference.

  • Apple TV will support PlayStation and Xbox controllers

    by 
    Edgar Alvarez
    Edgar Alvarez
    06.03.2019

    Apple has been gradually improving its tvOS over the past couple of years, thanks to features such as zero sign-on for cable-powered apps and added support for Dolby Atmos audio. Most recently, the company also launched an overhauled version of the TV app, which is designed to be a one-stop-shop for all the entertainment needs of Apple TV owners. And today, at WWDC 2019, Apple has revealed tvOS 13, featuring support for Xbox One and PlayStation DualShock 4 controllers. This announcement is meant to complement Apple's upcoming game subscription service, Apple Arcade, which is expected to arrive this fall.

  • serts via Getty Images

    Apple will reportedly limit third-party tracking in kids apps

    by 
    Christine Fisher
    Christine Fisher
    05.31.2019

    As tech companies grapple with safety and privacy concerns, Apple will reportedly limit third-party tracking in kids apps starting next week. While the company hasn't announced the change, a source told The Wall Street Journal that it's in the works. Given that Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) is Monday -- and that Facebook and Google have used their respective developer conferences to tout privacy initiatives -- it wouldn't be surprising for Apple to announce increased privacy for kids.

  • Chris Velazco/Engadget

    What to expect from Apple at WWDC 2019

    by 
    Chris Velazco
    Chris Velazco
    05.30.2019

    Next week, thousands of people will flock to San Jose, California; nestle into their seats at the convention center; and listen to Apple unspool its vision for the future of software. They'll get their first concrete look at iOS 13 and learn what it means for their phones and tablets. They'll hear more about how the gap between iOS and Mac apps is starting to shrink -- albeit slowly. They might even get an early look at some new Pro-level hardware. And since we'll be there covering the show in full, you'll hear all about that stuff as soon as we do.

  • Thomas Trutschel via Getty Images

    Apple Pay will support NFC stickers on scooters and parking meters

    by 
    Christine Fisher
    Christine Fisher
    05.13.2019

    Apple is reportedly working on a new NFC feature that will allow iPhone users to make Apple Pay purchases by tapping special, NFC-equipped tags. That means retailers won't need bulky terminals, and iPhone users won't need to download a third-party app before, say, buying clothes or adding miles to their scooter rental. According to 9to5mac, Apple is partnering with Bonobos clothing store, PayByPhone parking meters and Bird scooters on the initial roll out.

  • Chris Velazco/Engadget

    Apple Watch may soon get an on-device App Store

    by 
    Jon Fingas
    Jon Fingas
    05.06.2019

    It's no secret that Apple has plenty of software updates in store for WWDC, but the biggest improvements may come to one of its smallest devices -- namely, the Apple Watch. Bloomberg sources claim to know many of the software introductions planned for the June developer event, and watchOS would receive major updates that make it considerably less dependent on an iPhone. To start, the Apple Watch would get an on-device App Store -- like Google Play on Wear OS, you wouldn't have to load apps on your smartphone first.